Tag Archives: celiac

Holy Crap this bread has a ton of fibre!

High fibre and delicious

High fibre and delicious

  I fell in love with Holy Crap© Skinny B cereal a couple of years ago.  Ever since it has been a staple of my diet.  I have it with some coconut milk in the morning, throw some in my yogurt and add it to cookies I make for the kids (shhhh! Don’t tell them).  I love the fibre and find it keeps me regular always a happy place to be.  Here is a list of the benefits of Holy Crap©; non-GMO, organic, gluten free, kosher,  lactose free, sugar free, salt free, nut free, all natural, vegan, raw, very high in fiber, high in iron, source of calcium, source of omega-3 and omega-6, no cooking required.

I also ended up with a ton of apples after a day of apple picking in September which I decided to slice up and dehydrate.  After dehydrating them I put them in the VitaMix© and made an apple granola.

Now what a treat to add some apple granola to my Holy Crap© and toss in my yogurt! Very Yummy!.

So I decided to see what it would taste like if I tossed it in our Yeast Free Bread mix.  Well the result was great tasting bread that is really high in fibre, approximately 5.7g of fibre per slice!

I made a sandwich using chicken salad and it was truly a fantastic tasting sandwich.  The bread has a very faint apple flavour and just a hint of sweetness.  It is very moist and held together nicely in a sandwich.

I think this will be my new favorite bread recipe.  Enjoy!

bread

Holy Crap/Apple YEAST-FREE BREAD

Makes one loaf of bread

  • 2 tbsp ground Chia seeds or ground flaxseed
  • 3 tbsp apple cider vinegar
  • 1/4 cup warm water
  • 1/3 cup virgin olive oil or oil of your choice
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 tbsp honey
  • 1 package of Allergic Solution Yeast Free Bread
  • ¼ c chopped dried apple
  • 2 Tbsp Holy Crap Skinny B cereal

 

INSTRUCTIONS

  1. Preheat oven to 400°F and grease bread pan.
  2. In a large bowl, add ground Chia/Flax, vinegar and 1/4 cup of warm water.
  3. Stir and let sit for 1 – 2 minutes.
  4. Add  honey and mix well
  5. Add oil and 1 cup of water to bowl and stir until combined.
  6. Add entire package of AS-YFB  and stir until completely combined.
  7. Mix in Holy Crap and Apple
  8. Pour into bread pan and gently shake until evenly distributed.
  9. Bake for 1 hour and 5 minutes.
  10.  Allow to cool for approximately 30 minutes.

*Note, once it has risen (about 10 min in oven) cover with foil so it does not brown too much.  Honey can make the crust very dark

 

Holy Crap Cereal can be purchased from  the Gluten Free Smart Store 

 

 

 

 

Savoury Biscuits (Gluten, egg, nut, corn and soy free. Dairy-free optional)

Just in time for  Canadian Thanksgiving!   I made these savory biscuits a couple of ways this week.  They are tasty without cheese but I  also tried adding parmesan cheese to a batch and they were very tasty too.  If oregano is not your favourite herb then try thyme but you can use whatever savoury spices and seasonings you love.

You can also create a dessert biscuit by adding a couple of of tablespoons of coconut sugar and some cinnamon. This would make a  nice base for some fresh berries and whip cream. 

Savoury Biscuits

Savoury Biscuits

Biscuit Recipe

Ingredients

  • 2 cups Allergic Solution Pancake/Waffle Mix
  • 4 tablespoons vegetable shortening or coconut oil
  • 2/3 cup Rice Milk
  • 1 tsp dried oregano or seasoning of your choice
  • 1 tsp garlic powder
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • 3 tbs parmesan cheese (optional)

Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 375F.
2. Mix together pancake mix and seasonings.
3. Cut in shortening or coconut oil until mix resembles coarse cornmeal.
4. Add rice milk, a little at a time, until a soft dough forms.
5. The dough will be very sticky, drop about 3 tablespoons onto greased cookie sheet.  Dip fingers in water and form into patty about ½ inch thick.
6.  Bake 8-10 minutes until done (keep an eye on them, they’ll burn fast!)

I’m Celiac – Now What Do I Eat? (Guest Post)

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By Lisa Cantkier (bio below)

From one celiac to another—when it comes to food, I can attest—less really is more. With the recent explosion of gluten-free products hitting store shelves, one thing is certain—the quantity of product selection is growing, however, the nutritional value of our food supply is becoming less and less certain.

For example, when you read ingredient labels, at which I’m sure you’ve become an expert detective, you may notice that many lists are quite long. Also, ingredient names may look unfamiliar to you. That is not a good sign when reading the label of a product you want to consume. Unfamiliar ingredients more often than not equate with additives, preservatives and chemicals that are very likely not good for our overall health. If you have no idea what those ingredients are, chances are you wouldn’t want them in your already fragile gut.

If and when you plan to purchase pre-packaged gluten-free foods, you are far better off to choose products that have ingredient lists that are short, and contain all-natural, healthy ingredients that you are familiar with. Try to avoid processed/refined foods, and foods that are high in sugar and high on the glycemic index. Your gut will thank you.

When cooking and baking fresh and from scratch at home, choose simple recipes made with wholesome, clean whole food ingredients. Choose organic ingredients when possible. Don’t forget your protein and heart healthy fats. Eat nutrient-rich vegetables and fruit, such as kale, broccoli and avocado. Replace rice with quinoa, and choose lean proteins such as fish and poultry. Add super-foods rich in antioxidants such as chia seeds, hemp hearts and flax seeds to cereals, soups and sauces. Use a spiraler to make your own quick noodles from sweet potatoes or zucchini. Bake homemade pizza and lasagna with an eggplant base. Use natural sweeteners such as stevia, coconut sugar and maple syrup to replace refined sugar. Use healthier cooking oils, such as high quality extra virgin olive oil or coconut oil in place of vegetable oils.

When reaching for snacks on-the-go, get your protein in there. Make a quick, all-natural smoothie with added fruit and pure whey protein. Reach for mixed nuts or dried fruit. Slice up those veggies and dip them in fresh hummus or another favorite dip like spinach dip. There are so many natural nut butters on the market today—I love cashew butter for its sweet flavor. Pair it with wholesome, crunchy quinoa crackers. If you can handle dairy, choose low fat cottage cheese or Greek yogurt. Try something new. Eat kale! Defrost some edamame. Try those sea vegetables in the produce isle.

Instead of buying what’s in the box, be prepared to think outside the box and experiment with new, healthy foods. Since celiac disease is a malabsorptive disease, every bite matters, and you want those bites to be nutrient dense. You might not fall in love with everything you try, however, you won’t know until you take that bite. Happy, healthy gluten-free eating!

Lisa Cantkier is a lifelong celiac, health writer and editor, and holistic nutrition enthusiast. She is the founder of GlutenFreeFind.com and a co-creator of GlutenFreeSmartStore.com. You can follow Lisa at @LisaCantkier

 

Going Gluten-free is Often Not Enough!

17463_wpm_lowresRecently I had a conversation with a gentleman that has very unstable type 2 diabetes.  Unstable because as soon as he deviates from his very strict diet he becomes either hypo or hyper glycemic.

He shared with me that 40 of his 58 years he ate like crap.  He left home at 18, his mother only cooked from scratch and many things she grew herself including their meat.  When he left home for university he survived on junk food and fast food.  When he got married his wife loved to bake and they ate sweets every night.  Both he and his wife were diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes in their late 40’s.  They were both on medication and ‘cheated’ quite often.  Within 5 years they were both on insulin and his wife died of complication from diabetes 3 years ago.  After his wife died he decided food was just not worth his health.

Why am I sharing this with you?  Well for me it really hit home because having food allergies/sensitivities I moan and complain about not being able to eat this and that.  I meet many celiacs/people with food allergies and sensitivities that just want food that tastes good and they really are not concerned about the nutrition end of things.

Here is my take on it:  For years I worked with families of autistic kids to help them heal their kid’s guts.  For most children with autism it meant getting them off gluten, dairy, sugar and yeast, cleaning up the GI so they can heal.  Most autistic kids have leaky gut syndrome (small holes in their GI that food etc. can get through wreaking havoc in the system).  Basically these kids eat an anti-inflammatory diet to calm things down enough so they can heal.   Celiacs have a similar problem.  The GI is compromised, there is a lot of inflammation, nutrients are not absorbed and their whole system suffers.

Unfortunately just getting off gluten is not always enough.  It may be for a few years but the one thing I hear over and over again is eventually they start feeling unwell again.  Not always GI related, it could be joint pain, chronic migraines, skin problems, thyroid disease, type 2 diabetes etc.

When the GI tract is compromised it is imperative that we eat a good clean diet so we can fully heal.  Does that mean we can never have a ‘treat’?  No but we can’t be eating ‘crap’ every day.  Garbage in, garbage out! We truly are what we eat.  High inflammatory foods, high glycemic foods cannot be eaten every day or our health will suffer.  Steer clear of products that are high in sugar (especially refined sugars and artificial sweetners), high glycemic carbs (rice, corn and potato starches), artificial colours, flavours and additives, unhealthy fats and low fibre ingredients.

I like the 80/20 rule.  80% of the time, eat healthy foods (vegetables, fruit, lean meats, high fibre grains and healthy fats) and 20% of the time we eat the crappy stuff we all love so much.  Gluten free does not mean healthy.  If you are experiencing health challenges after getting off gluten take a serious and honest look at the foods you are consuming and start making some small choices….food really is not worth your health!

 

Canada’a Gluten-Free Market: So Many Choices!

Screen Shot 2013-06-11 at 6.48.42 AM 15 years ago I went gluten free. I had been feeling very bloated after eating, my stomach was distended, my joints ached and I had never ending diarrhea.  A naturopath I worked with suggested I stop eating gluten.  I had no idea what gluten was but I would have tried just about anything.  Within a week I was feeling good, no more bloating, stomach had flattened out, after a month, the joint pain was gone and no more diarrhea.  Over the years it has been suggested I be tested for Celiac disease but the problem is you have to eat gluten for 6 weeks to 3 month (depending on which doctor you talk to).  I am not willing to subject myself to that kind of pain so I will continue being ‘gluten intolerant’.

So I am feeling good but what the heck was there to eat?  I basically cut out most carbs from my diet and ate rice cakes if I wanted a sandwich.  Rice cakes DO NOT substitute bread.  15 years ago there was no such thing as the ‘gluten free’ aisle at the grocery store.  Rice cakes came everywhere with me; back then I travelled a lot for work so they became my go to snack.  Fast forward 15 years and I cannot even stand the smell of rice cakes!

To even dream of a trade show that was all about everything gluten free was not even in the realm of possibilities.  This past weekend we did the Canadian Celiac Association Gluten Free market place trade show.  The turnout was incredible!  It seems each show gets bigger and bigger.  Last fall we did the first ever Gluten Free Expo in Toronto; wall to wall people from opening to close, it was crazy busy all day.  January was the GF Expo in Vancouver which saw people standing in line for over 3 hours to get in.  It opened at 10am and by 5pm when it closed I had realised did not even have time to go to the bathroom all day!  This weekend was pretty much the same thing.  By 11am I had run out of samples and was off to the kitchen to bake some more.  I returned at 12:30 with 400 more samples and they were gone by 4pm.  I was so exhausted when I got home but it made me smile because for those newly diagnosed they really have a tremendous selection of products they can choose from.  You could try a new thing every day and never have to eat a rice cake!

I always smile when talking to newly diagnosed folks, “I have no idea what I am going to eat!” is generally one of the first things they talk about.  Hmmm try going gluten free 15 years ago!  Today it is more like “it is completely overwhelming the choices I have!”.  Part of me is glad, part of me is sad.  Glad because of the choices we have, sad because a lot of the choices are very unhealthy and sad because something very wrong is going on with our food chain.

When my grandpa was a boy, wheat was a staple of his diet.  My grandparents were poor, bread could be made cheap and last over a few days. No one heard of gluten issues.  Today it is rare if you don’t know someone with a problem with gluten.  So one hand we  can rejoice in all the choices but on the other hand we should all be terribly alarmed as to why so many of us can’t eat gluten…that my friends is another blog!